Into 2020 – fireworks in Vila Nova de Milfontes

Finding myself on vacation in Longueira, 10 km south of Milfontes, I managed to convince my wife to enter 2020 on the beach, while admiring the fireworks display planned for midnight. This was a challenge, because it meant leaving the warm house and venturing into a cold night. In the end, it payed off with a nice show over the river Mira estuary.

I wanted to make some photos, of course, so I packed my camera and lens (Fujifilm XH-1 and 16-55 f/2.8 lens), plus the tripod. I had a fully charged battery in the camera, and another one in my pocket, just in case. I was going to use longer than usual exposure times, between 2 seconds and 20 seconds, experimenting a bit. Photographing fireworks is always a trial and error exercise; registering one or more bursts can result in interesting results.

We chose to go to the south side of the river, opposite the fireworks launching area. This side of the river would be less crowded, and we would be able to see some good reflections on the water. After arriving, I set up the gear on the tripod, and did a few test shots; the view towards Milfontes is actually quite nice from this river bank: the old castle and houses were illuminated, with the light reflected on the water.

River reflections

At midnight, on time, the fireworks started, and lasted for 10 minutes. That kept me busy changing exposure times and focal lengths, trying to register different bursts and colours. I managed to do so, and was happy with the results I got.

Fireworks start
Two bursts
Single burst
Colours
The end

I wish everybody a Happy 2020.

Seasons come and go

Going back to the same place as the seasons change can be rewarding and an interesting experience. In the last few years I have driven across this farmhouse many times, normally on my way to Santa Clara a Velha damn, near Odemira, in the Alentejo province of Portugal. The land inside this farm is cultivated for cattle feed and has some excellent examples of the typical cork oak tree dotting the landscape.

There are several interesting compositions and framings, but the one that has attracted me the most in this place is placing a tree in the foreground, and the house at the top of the hill in the background. The two can then be connected visually by the farmland in the middle, which makes for a natural link between them.

I have now photographed this place in Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. This small project has happened subconsciously, and only recently have I realized that I had collected a seasonal portfolio of this location. What changes the most in the land, whilst the tree and the house remain as more fixed elements in the landscape. During Springtime, the land is lush with greenery and flowers, which wane and dry out in golden hues come the Summertime. During Autumn and Winter, the fields are cultivated again, thus initiating a new cycle.

I like how these changes mark the passage of time, while the old trees are almost like guardians of the land, witnessing the endless seasonal cycle of life. Seasons come and go, but some things never change, which is comforting. So, give it a try, and run your own small project like this one, documenting the seasonality of a landscape or other theme that attracts you. Results and images are bound to be interesting and rewarding.

Spring 2019
Spring 2019

Summer 2017
Summer 2017

Autumn 2019
Autumn 2019

 

The Fujinon XF35 mm F1.4 R lens in landscape use

I often go out in small photo walks with just one lens and no particular objective in mind. Since I prefer to use prime lenses, the one I decide to take in such outings is usually a focal length that I am used to. For this occasion it was the Fujinon 35mm f/1.4, which provides a normal angle of view.

Having recently spent a weekend in the Alentejo coast near Almograve, I simply carried one camera and one lens with me. I managed to take a short walk in a very familiar area, between the beach of Almograve and the fishing harbor of Lapa de Pombas, about 2 km long along the top of the cliffs. I wanted to take advantage of the low tide at sunset, to explore the small rocky inlets and pebbly beaches that can be found along these two locations.

Almograve is a starting point for one of the legs of the Vicentina trail that links to Cabo Sardão first, and then to Zambujeira do Mar. So it is very popular with trekkers, but they do not spend much time exploring this stretch of coast, which is a pity. Within this 2 km, if one descends to the sea, it is possible to find many interesting subjects, from the more generic landscapes, to more detailed aspects of rock textures and geologic features.

Normally, a normal lens is not the first choice when shooting landscapes, coming after the typical recommendation to use a wide angle lens instead. And that is fine, as I personally find that any lens from wide angles to telephotos can be used successfully for this genre. But I also think that a normal lens can facilitate a more natural angle of view on the landscape, without the exaggeration of distance between foreground and background (wide angle), or the magnified/compressed relationship resulting from a telephoto.

Along the way, there are several narrow sandy trails that are used by fishermen to go down to the sea level. Some of these are easier to negotiate then others, so due care is required. But the effort is well worth it, because once down near the sea, the cliffs are often made up of spectacular folded rock formations. These are a testimony to the the massive tectonic forces that have shaped the Earth, in this case during the Palaeozoic Era, hundreds of million years ago.

I spent the time until sunset carefully composing interesting frames of numerous subjects, such as craggy vertical rock surfaces, veined by mineral fractures; folded rocks; isolated plants clinging to the scarce soil. During and after sunset, I concentrated on the colorful clouds and water reflections, plus some rocky silhouettes. It is surprising the richness of subjects that can be found in this small area.

I find the small Fujinon lens perfect for such photo walks, providing a highly versatile tool for experimenting around. I found myself playing with depth of field when photographing a close up of a small shrub, with the cliffs behind. It is really simple to change the aperture on the dedicated lens ring, and this ends up providing a more tactile connection with the lens. The lens has high quality optics and provides an excellent starting point during processing of the RAW files later on. I only applied normal white balance, color and contrast adjustments, and the images came out really well.

The Fujinon 35mm f/1.4 lens (courtesy Fujifilm)
The Fujinon 35mm f/1.4 lens (courtesy Fujifilm)

almograve_25_10_19_10_net

Rock skin
Rock skin

Fractures and veins
Fractures and veins

Folds
Folds

Folds
Folds

Rock textures
Rock textures

Folds
Folds

Folding panorama
Folding panorama – 12 vertical photos

Lone blur - f/11
Lone blur – f/11

Lone blur - f/2.8
Lone blur – f/2.8

Colorful beach
Colorful beach

Colorful sky
Colorful sky

Castles of rock
Castles of rock

After sunset
After sunset

 

Returning to familiar places – a challenge

What to do on a Sunday afternoon on a rainy day? Get out of the house and take a photo walk – even if you end up in a place you have visited many times before! This is what I did recently during a weekend in my quiet little house in Longueira, Alentejo coast. After lunch and some lazying around with my cat Jonas, I decided to pick up my photo backpack and head out to the coast. The weather was not very inviting, but I am always optimistic and hoped for some respite and clearings close to sunset.

I often head out without any pre-determined goal, ending up being rewarded with some nice surprises and good photos. So why not this time too? I decided to make it simple and only packed my 2 cameras (Fujifilm X-T2 and X-H1) and 2 lenses (16 f/1.4 and 90 f/2) – this is normally my go to kit for landscapes and exploring around. The wide angle suits the way I “see” landscapes, and the telephoto allows me to isolate details in the cliffs and some nature close-ups. Added a small tripod and a few filters for long exposures, and I was all set.

I parked the car at the small fishing harbour of Lapa de Pombas, and started my walk from the sign post indicating the Vicentina Trail, towards the South. Regardless of how many times I am in this area,  I always enjoy being close to the sand dunes, the sea, the cliffs, in summary, unspoiled Nature. I snap a few shots here and there, looking for new angles in familiar subjects. As we are in mid-October, the days are already noticeable shorter, with sunset around 7 pm. The cloud cover starts to dissipate, and some clearings start to appear. This allows me to take a few shots of the low angle light hitting the cliffs and the fossilized sand dunes, with their erosional patterns and textures.

In one of the locations, the sand dunes are covered by  craggier rock formations that have been eroded into sharp corners, so it is necessary to pay attention while walking. The rustier colour of the land perfectly complements the blue azure of the sea and the white foamy waves. Several sea gulls float around carried by the soft breeze.

The last time I walked this part of the trail was earlier this year, in January (https://blog.paulobizarro.com/?p=693). At the time, I wanted to make some photos for my May exhibit (https://blog.paulobizarro.com/?p=752), notably a photo from a rock arch that is located along the way. Then, I only had a 23mm wide angle lens, and even though the photo turned out fine, I wanted to come back and use a wider angle. The best place to frame the arch is right at the edge of the cliff, so the room to maneuver is not much. Of course a zoom lens would have worked too, but I prefer primes.

Keeping an eye on the light conditions, I noticed the Sun would probably come out soon, as it was descending towards a narrow clearing between the clouds – I literally scrambled down the sand covered rocks of the cliff, set up the tripod and proceeded to make several shots, both with and without a long exposure setting. I had to work quickly, because the Sun was indeed playing hide and seek with the cloud cover. For a couple of minutes, it burst through, illuminating the cliffs and sea, which was perfect. I was confident I had managed to get some interesting photos.

As a bonus, as I was climbing back to return to the trail, I noticed a small snake basking in the sunshine. I approached carefully and used my 90 mm lens to make some close ups; later on I found out that it belongs to the Rhinechis scalaris species, which is common in Portugal.

On the way back to the car, I simply enjoyed the walk along the trail, making a few more photos of the sunset and the coast line. This is simply a magical place, and after the Summer bustle, even better to visit and enjoy.

Small fishing harbour - Lapa de Pombas
Small fishing harbour – Lapa de Pombas

Small fishing harbour - Lapa de Pombas
Small fishing harbour – Lapa de Pombas

On the Vicentina trail
On the Vicentina trail

Rusty dunes
Rusty dunes

Small fig trees in the cliffs
Small fig trees in the cliffs

Along the trail
Along the trail

Oceanside
Oceanside

Eroded dunes
Eroded dunes

The Arch
The Arch

The Arch
The Arch

Cabo Sardão far away
Cabo Sardão far away

Small cove
Small cove

Small snake
Small snake

Boat trip in the river Mira

Last month I finally managed to take a trip that had been in my plans for quite some time. I am talking about the boat trip that goes up the river Mira, between Milfontes and Odemira. The river Mira, one of the least polluted in Europe, springs in the serra do Caldeirão in Algarve, and runs its course for about 130 km until it reaches the Atlantic in Milfontes. It is one of the few Portuguese rivers that flows from south to north. Along its course, the waters are captured by the Santa Clara a Velha dam, as I have written in a previous post.

This part of the river between Milfontes and Odemira is around 30 km long, can be navigated by boat, and is part of the Parque Natural do Sudoeste Alentejano e Costa Vicentina. During the summer months, two boat tour companies organize such trips, going both ways, up the river, and down the river. I opted to take the option of going up the river, starting in Milfontes. The trip takes about 2,5 hours in total, in a small boat that can carry 6 people.

We met André (from Bture), the skipper, a young and pro-active fellow, a bit before departing time, at 10.30 am. The schedules are dependent on the tides, so going upriver means profiting from the rising tide. After everybody settled, we started our trip with a short detour to see the magnificent view of Milfontes from the river – the highlights are the beaches (the morning was cloudy and somewhat cool, so not many people were around), and the 16th century fort of São Clemente, with its ramparts rising almost from the sand.

We were soon passing below the bridge, that was built in the mid-1970’s, thus facilitating the communication by road between the two margins; at its time, the bridge was a key element of fostering the development of the entire coast. Before that, the closest crossing point was in Odemira proper, 20 km away. Not to mention the locals of Milfontes themselves, that had to cross by boat. Today, crossing by boat is still a fun experience, and Dona Maria has a small boat just to do that. After the bridge, the river keeps winding in quiet and smooth sections, and we cross several fishermen in their boats. It seems a busy morning, but then, this river has abundant fish, like sea bass and corvina. There are also many species of aquatic birds, that André is happy to identify.

The sky is still covered in clouds, but this is not bad, as it makes the trip a bit cooler during this late July morning. The river continues to meander between gentle hills covered with cork oak trees, pine trees, and eucalyptus. Here and there, a few isolated houses can be spotted amongst the greenery, normally associated with small wooden piers. We pass a few abandoned salinas, old tracts of trapped water that in the past would produce salt by evaporation.

The silence and quietness are impressive, and we seem to simply float above the water. The boat’s engine is the only sound we hear, but even then, it is not that loud, because we go at low speed. About halfway along the trip, André suggests opening a bottle of wine, accompanied by some typical cheese from Alentejo: what an excellent idea! As if agreeing with us, the sun finally breaks the cloud cover, and we now seem to glide surrounded by the green and yellow hills, plus the sky reflected in the water. The margins are abundant with reeds, that hide the odd small bird. After another gentle curve, we spot a present-day oyster farm, it was reactivated in the 1980’s and it is still lucrative.

The morning rolls along at a slow rhythm, and the river gets narrower as we approach Odemira. After a final curve, we finally see the village in the distance, with its houses climbing up the hills, painted in the typical white facades with blue and yellow stripes. We dock in the small pier, and it is time to say goodbye to André and our trip companions. There is now some free time to have lunch, and after a couple of hours, a taxi transportation is arranged to carry the participants back to Milfontes. André will wait for the tide to reverse, and will make the trip downriver now, with a new set of passengers. It was a great experience for me, being able to know and see the region from a different perspective.

I took a lot of photos with my small and trusty companion for such occasions, the Fujifilm X100F. I can see a lot of potential to make this trip again, perhaps more dedicated to bird watching, which requires a different photographic kit.

As a final note, I leave you with a few links for your reference.

Boat tours:

https://www.bture.pt/

http://www.riveremotions.pt/

Bird watching:

http://www.avesdeportugal.info/sitestumira.html

Natural Park Alentejo and Vicentina Coast:

http://www2.icnf.pt/portal/ap/p-nat/pnsacv

Milfontes
Milfontes

Milfontes
Milfontes

Milfontes
Milfontes

Milfontes
Milfontes

Where is my signal?
Where is my signal?

Abandoned
Abandoned

Arriving at Odemira
Arriving at Odemira

Location_Mira_River
Location map

Water, land, and sky

 

Southwest Alentejo in June – part 3

This is the third and final instalment of a set of posts I wanted to make about my recent vacation in the area of Longueira, Odemira municipality, Alentejo. The first post talked about photographing the river Mira and the countryside near Vale Figueira, and the second post addressed the small fishing harbour of Lapa de Pombas, in the coast.

For this final piece, I want to take you to Milfontes, which is one of the highlights of the region. This is a village that is rich in history, from its colourful 16th century stories of pirates, to more recent “invasions” of peaceful tourists. From the three photographic sessions I wanted to carry out during this time – off, this was the one I had really planned: I wanted to photograph the interesting polygonal coastal rock formations at low tide during sunset. When the conditions are right, the water remains in small tidal pools and reflects the colours and light of the sunset, making for a truly spectacular scenery.

A quick research about tide, sunset, and Moon rise conditions, led me to reserve the evening of 15th June for this objective. There would be an excellent combination of a 70 cm low tide close to sunset at around 9 pm. The Moon would rise near full within that time period, perhaps providing more opportunities. The only thing that was more uncertain was the presence of dramatic clouds to fuel the interest during sunset; the only thing that was persistent during the day were some strong winds and clear skies… hoping for the best and keeping my fingers crossed, I pickled up my backpack and tripod, and made the short 10 km drive between Longueira and Milfontes, arriving about 1 hour before sunset.

I parked near the small lighthouse in the northern bank of the river mouth, which is not a bad location for nice views of the coast to the south, and the village proper, to the east. I spent some time making a few photos with the new Fujinon 16mm f/1.4 lens that I am testing (and that I have used for the photos in the previous two chapters of this essay). Even though this lens is larger and heavier than the 14mm f/2.8 lens (that I have used for years), after a few days of using it I was very comfortable – it basically feels and handles like a grown up version of the 14mm lens (same set of controls) – with the bonus of being more robust (it has Fuji’s Weather Resistant construction and labelling), and 2 stops faster (which can be handy sometimes). One other important change is that the aperture ring is a lot less “free rotating” in the 16mm lens, compared to the other.

Anyway, enough of gear talk… From the vicinity of the car park and after a few photos, I walked down to the beach, where the tide was already very low; I think that the combined effort of near full Moon plus the approaching summer solstice were contributing to such low tide levels. Even better for my plans. Walking along the sandy shallows and the rocks, I managed to reach a good distance away from “land”; this allowed me to make some photos that were completely new to me, which was excellent. In some places, the sand had consolidated into sharp – edged rock formations, so be sure to wear good shoes (summer – type flip – flops will not do!). There were plenty of interesting sand patterns, waves, and the view of Milfontes from this far away to keep me busy for a while.

As the Sun was approaching the horizon, I made my way back and entered the area that I was really interested in, featuring the above mentioned polygonal tidal pools. I took a few test shots to get a feel for the compositions, and finally decided on a location to set up the tripod. I already had a few filters ready in my pockets, as being prepared and ready helps a lot, especially if working over water – you don’t want to drop your precious Lee Big Stopper ND filter on the tide pool, or fumble in your backpack when the light is just great. My greatest fear – lack of an interesting sky – went away, because as the sunset approached, there were long and wispy clouds reflecting the light. This turned out to be a highlight of the session for me, and I was soon shooting frame after frame, as the light changed colour and intensity. I spent more than 1 hour in that place, shooting well after sunset. What a fantastic way to end the day, and I felt blessed to be able to witness this show of Nature.

Milfontes - location
Milfontes – location

Arriving view
Arriving view

It's looking good
It’s looking good

Estuary low tide
Estuary low tide

Sand waves
Sand waves

End of the road
End of the road

Erosion
Erosion

Tide pools - general view
Tide pools – general view

Tide pools
Tide pools

Touching
Touching

Moon bonus
Moon bonus

Colour harmony
Colour harmony

Stripes
Stripes

Exit
Exit

Two banks
Two banks

My photo exhibit in Odemira

This new post is all about my new photo exhibit that just opened on May 3rd in the Municipal Library José Saramago, in Odemira. As you may recall, I have been working hard on the preparation steps, involving a selection of 15 photos, and engaging with the Library’s staff to ensure everything went smoothly. I can now say that the opening was a relaxed and fun event, and everything went very well. I am grateful for all the help I got from the staff, plus all the family support.

The theme of the exhibit was about “Landscapes with Memories – Odemira”. I have been visiting this region for more than 40 years, so I have plenty of memories (and photos) that I have been collecting and making along this time. Odemira is home of some of the best beaches in Portugal, which are a haven for those that want to enjoy Nature. The interior of the region, with its rolling hills and farms, offers a nice contrast with the seaside. I am now planning for a more thorough exploration of this interior area, so stay tuned!

Below I am showing all the photos that are part of the exhibit, plus a few from the inauguration. I hope you enjoy them.

20190503_120207 IMG-20190503-WA0016

Almograve Brejo Largo Milfontes Milfontes Milfontes Milfontes Cabo Sardão Cabo Sardão Cabo Sardão Cabo Sardão Cabo Sardão Zambujeira do Mar Santa Clara a Velha Odemira Odemira

Spring has arrived

Spring has finally arrived, bringing with it longer days, more sunshine, and lots of flower covered fields. In my recent weekend visits to Longueira and Almograve, I have kept an eye out for one of my favourite Spring photographic subjects – poppies. This flower can impart a very special character to any area, sprinkling the fields with small red dots. Every year they seem to appear in different parts of the region, with stronger or weaker presence.

Last year, I remember sawing them in a good number quite close to Odemira. This year, the best area I have seen so far is just before Milfontes, where there are many red poppies among the lupine fields. I noticed it whilst driving past; there they were right next to the road. A large tract of land covered with yellow lupine and the conspicuous red splashes of the poppies. I was elated to see this view, because just a mere days before this field was empty of such colour. Such is Spring, whimsical and surprising.

I made a mental note to plan and come back for an early morning shooting session in the next couple of days. I knew that the light at sunrise would be great over this area, bathing the flowers in golden light. I also knew that I would have to return relatively quickly, because poppies are fragile – their petals do not resist stronger winds or showers, which had been abundant recently. It is a good thing that I do not mind (very much) to wake up well before sunrise…

Thus, one morning I packed up my photo backpack plus tripod, and off I went. It is a short drive from my house in Longueira, and I really like the time of day before sunrise – Nature seems to be waking up, and the morning was clear with some clouds over the mountains, from where the Sun would rise. Excellent conditions for photography, with some clouds adding interest to the sky. After arriving, I strolled into the fields looking for nice compositions, making the most of side light and contre jour conditions. I had decided to bring only a couple a lenses in my Fujifilm X system; the 14mm wide angle, and the 50-140mm telephoto zoom. The former would be able to frame the typical wide vistas of the landscape, whereas the latter would allow flexibility and some close-ups. To add a bit more versatility, I had also packed an old Canon 250D close-up lens, to use on the zoom. This significantly increases the magnification (up to around 0.25X), which is nice for semi-macro shooting.

I started shooting before sunrise, when the light was still low, just to experiment and explore the surroundings and subjects. The light became much more interesting when the Sun started to crest the mountains in the East; I started to shoot faster, trying to make the most of it. As I was close to the road, I must have made a strange spectacle to people driving past, lying low on the ground to frame the poppies against the rising Sun! At one point, an old farmer showed up with his dog, and we had a nice conversation, with me trying to explain how interesting his field of flowers was to photograph. As I always do, next time I am back I will give him a print.

After about 1 hour, I was confident that I had managed to capture some interesting photos, so it was time to go back home for breakfast. Looking back at the last year or so, I reflected how lucky I was to be able to photograph this beautiful region throughout the various seasons. Each season brings a different feel and emotion, and Spring is no different. I will be back in about a week, with plans to visit the fields near Santa Clara-a-Velha, more to the interior. I think that more flowers are waiting.

Sunrise
Sunrise

Poppy at sunrise
Poppy at sunrise

Sunrise
Sunrise

The fields
The fields

Towering
Towering

Red and blue
Red and blue

Delicate
Delicate

Red and yellow
Red and yellow

Transparent
Transparent

Close.up
Close.up

Milfontes at sunset

Milfontes is a well known village in the Alentejo coast. At the confluence of the Mira river and the Atlantic ocean, it is a popular Summer destination for beach lovers. As part of the Southwest Alentejo Natural Park, it also offers year – round attractions, with its pristine landscapes, worth exploring along its many walking trails.

I am currently assembling a portfolio about the Odemira region, to be exhibited locally in May,  at the Jose Saramago library. As such, I am selecting photos that portray the rich diversity on Odemira’s municipality, from its many beaches (the best in Portugal, as the slogan says) to the more interior landscapes.

While looking at the portfolio, I saw that I was missing some potentially interesting locations, such as the one overlooking the Furnas beach, on the South bank of the Mira. Such a spot offers great views of the popular Furnas beach and Milfontes village, looking North. So I planned for a sunset shooting session  a couple of weeks ago. Being Winter, I had the place to myself, and so it was really peaceful; I simply love to being outside, and consider myself lucky to be able to experience Nature at tis best.

I walked a bit along the coast, exploring to the South, amongst hardened sand dunes, where water and wind had sculpted interesting shapes. There are always interesting photo opportunities, when one is willing to keep an open eye. As sunset was approaching, I set up my tripod and experimented with several exposure times and framings. As always, I like to keep things simple, so I only carried 1 lens for my Fujifilm camera, and that was the 23mm f1.4.

I kept shooting well until after sunset, into the so-called blue hour. In fact, while I was walking back to the car, I stopped a few times, and ended up taking a few more frames. At the end of the day, I suspect I will have a few more portfolio options; if not. then the experience was well worth it. As a landscape photographer, experiencing a place is rewarding enough for me. And Milfontes is certainly such a place.

Erosion
Erosion

Furnas beach view
Furnas beach view

Sunset
Sunset

Beach sunset
The coast looking South

Nightfall
Nightfall

Milfontes
Milfontes panorama

Zambujeira do Mar – Winter wonder

Zambujeira do Mar is a quaint little village located a few km South of Cabo Sardão, in the Alentejo coast. Together with Milfontes and Almograve, it completes the trio of the most famous beaches in the Odemira municipality. Similarly to the other coastal towns in the area, during the Winter there are hardly any tourists or visitors around, which makes for perfect and quiet conditions to visit. During the Summer, the small village receives a significant number of vacationers, plus a dedicated crowd during one of the most famous music festivals in Portugal.

The principal attraction is of course the beach, secluded between rocky spurs, that provide protection against the often rough sea and northerly winds. The topography is familiar to those that know the area – the coast in the region offers a string of several beaches separated by cliffs of Palaeozoic rock formations of variable colour. While in Cabo Sardão to the North the dark rocks dominate, here the prevalent colour is yellow, which makes for a nice contrast with the blue sky and blue green water of the sea.

I am preparing an image portfolio of the most interesting locations in Odemira’s municipality, and I was surprised to see that I had very few photos of Zambujeira. I normally shoot more often between Cabo Sardão and Milfontes to the North. This was something I needed to correct, so I arranged for a short trip during the weekend. My plan was to take a walk between Zambujeira and Alteirinhos, the first beach south of the village. You can see the map for a simple location.

I wanted to photograph during golden and blue hours, that is, around and after sunset. The scenery is beautiful, and suitable for long exposures of the sea against the rough cliffs. It also helped that there were some clouds to provide some colour and interest in the sky. For this trip, I simply took my Fuji kit (Fujifilm X-T2 and Fujinon 14 f2.8 lens) and tripod plus Lee Big Stopper filter. My first stop was at the Alteirinhos beach, where I was surprised to find a waterfall; the tide was coming in, but I was able to set up my tripod and take a few shots, testing several exposure times to see how the water flow would come out. I then spend some time exploring different viewpoints from the beach, and was happy with the results.

It is easy to loose track of time, and sunset was approaching quickly. I made my way back to Zambujeira, as I wanted to photograph the village and the beach. I shot several compositions and different exposure times, well into the night, as the Moon had risen and was bright in the sky. I ended my trip simply seating near the small chapel of Nossa Senhora do Mar (Our Lady of the Sea), at the top of the cliff, and looking West, into the ocean. A perfect way of finishing a wonderful photographic session.

Location map
Location map

Waterfall in Alteirinhos beach
Waterfall in Alteirinhos beach

Alteirinhos beach - looking North
Alteirinhos beach – looking North

Alteirinhos beach - looking North
Alteirinhos beach – looking North

Alteirinhos beach
Alteirinhos beach

Alteirinhos beach - looking South
Alteirinhos beach – looking South

Sunset and cliffs
Sunset and cliffs

Zambujeira do Mar
Zambujeira do Mar

Alteirinhos beach at sunset
Alteirinhos beach at sunset

Zambujeira do Mar at sunset
Zambujeira do Mar at sunset

Zambujeira do Mar blue hour
Zambujeira do Mar blue hour